Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/parst <p>The Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand is the main organ of communication of the Society. It publishes research articles in all areas of philosophy.</p> The Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand en-US Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand 1905-4084 The Consciousness of the Dead as a Philosophical Problem in Ancient China (Pattira Thaithosaeng, Trans.) https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/parst/article/view/258517 <p>บทความแปลจากภาษาอังกฤษเป็นภาษาไทย จากต้นฉบับเรื่อง The Consciousness of the Dead as a Philosophical Problem in Ancient China โดย Paul Rakita Goldin (2015) แปลโดย ดร.ภัททิรา ไทยทอแสง </p> Paul R. Goldin Copyright (c) 2022 Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand 2022-11-06 2022-11-06 17 1 Poetics of Focalization in Mūlamadhyamakakārikā in Chinese Version https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/parst/article/view/256419 <p>This article aims to analyze <em>M</em><em>ū</em><em>lamadhyamakak</em><em>ā</em><em>rik</em><em>ā</em> through literary approach. From literary point of view, Nāgārajuna transforms sensorial perceptions into characters via “narrative voices” in two aspects: (1) a narrative voice as a character in story, or “intratextual voice,” such as: the first person narrative point of view, “I” as male protagonist in story-telling (2) sensorial perception as “hidden narrator” who can be Nāgārajuna’s voice or a representation of collective solipsism in form of “imaginary unconscious”. This collective solipsism modified by citta or vijñāna via sensory organs: eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, and mind, are represented aloofly as the third person which constructs a “closure” and “distance” between “narrator” and “narratee”. The closure and distance in focalization helpfully creates the 3-level-dialectical effects: (1) the intimacy between reader and narratee, such as: cakṣurvijñāna, śrotravijñāna, ghrāṇavijñāna, jihvāvijñāna, kāyavijñāna, and manovijñāna. (2) the disinterestedness by unengaging reader from the narratee or what is narrated (3) when reader touches both the intimacy and disinterestedness, he or she will discover that sensorial representation via narrative voice is non-existent as mental fabrication or <em>xinshengmie </em>心生滅, and be aware that “narrative voice” in one aspect is a source of “self-nature” or <em>zixing</em> 自性, propelled by “particularization-consciousness” or <em>fenbieshi</em> 分別識 . Because Nāgārajuna knows well the seed of māra 魔羅 by means of “narrative voice,” he “tames” and “turns” it into what is narrated or a narratee in order to reach the “poetics of śūnyatā bhāva”.</p> Nipon Sasipanudej Copyright (c) 2022 Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand 2022-11-06 2022-11-06 17 1 An Analysis of the Weak Dynamics View: François Recanati's Two-Level Account https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/parst/article/view/258470 <p>Recanati holds that dynamic thoughts involve two distinct types of files: fine-grained files based on a specific relation in a particular context and coarse-grained files based on multiple relations in the whole context. I argue that Recanati’s mental file account is a two-level account that is independent of each other. This account faces two problems. Firstly, it is in contradiction to the principle of compositionality, and secondly, there is a gap between the two types of files, which implies that coarse-grained files do not exist.</p> Pailin Pinsumang Copyright (c) 2022 Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand 2022-11-06 2022-11-06 17 1 Why is the forward sequence of Dependent Origination the wrong path? : An annotated translation of the Commentary to the Nidānasaṃyutta’s Discourse of the [Two] Paths https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/parst/article/view/256630 <p>In the Pāli <em>Paṭipadā Sutta</em> (<em>Discourse of the</em> [<em>Two</em>] <em>Paths</em>) of the Nidānasaṃyutta, the Buddha distinguishes two opposite paths of dependent origination (<em>paṭicca-samuppāda</em>); the forward sequence (<em>anuloma</em>) of dependent origination is the wrong path (<em>micchāpaṭipadā</em>), while the reverse sequence (<em>paṭiloma</em>) is the right path (<em>sammāpaṭipadā</em>). However, a question is raised as to why the former is called the wrong path: despite ignorance, there are also meritorious volitional formations (<em>puññābhisaṅkhāra</em>) and imperturbable volitional formations (<em>āneñjābhisaṅkhāra</em>) being generated. The commentary to the Sutta (<em>Paṭipadāsuttavaṇṇanā</em>) explains that actions or attainments rooted in the desire for success within the cycle of rebirth (<em>saṃsāra</em>) are not good enough to free a person from suffering. However, actions that are rooted in the aspiration for <em>nibbāna</em>, will eventually lead to liberation. This article provides an annotated English translation of the commentary to the <em>Paṭipadā Sutta</em>, with selected input from its sub-commentary (<em>Nidānavagga-purāṇaṭīkā</em>) and a brief outline of the philosophical tenets addressed in the text.</p> Eng Jin Ooi Copyright (c) 2022 Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand 2022-11-06 2022-11-06 17 1 Buddhism, Chinese Funeral Rites, and Theravada Tradition in Malaysia https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/parst/article/view/257450 <p>In Malaysian Buddhist tradition, when a person dies, funeral rites are performed to ensure the well-being of the deceased. These are not actually Buddhist practices and there is no efficacy in meaningless and wasteful rites founded not on moral or ethical values but instead on <em>Mixin</em> (superstitious). The Buddhist attitude towards ritual can be seen from its reference to <em>silabbata-paramasa</em> (“clinging to rules and rites”), an expression used to signify an attitude of over-dependence on ritual based on mere superstitions through ignorance and fear. Out of ignorance and fear, rituals are designed specifically for the benefit of the soul of the deceased to help the deceased achieve liberation from misery of death.&nbsp; Such a deeply rooted belief that only through such rituals can help the deceased achieve liberation from misery of death undermines the central Theravāda Buddhist doctrines of <em>kamma</em>. In Buddhism there is no soul as it holds the <em>anatman</em> view. The Theravāda answer that merits accrued in lifetime is of a direct consequence to the well-being of the deceased is based on its doctrine of four-fold <em>kamma</em>, explicitly stated in <em>AbhidhammatthaSa</em><em>ṅ</em><em>gaha</em>.&nbsp; Therefore, a proper Buddhist funeral is performed as an outward expression of respect and gratitude for the deceased. In Buddhism the concepts of non-self and <em>kamma</em> are that upon death what is left is only matter and how the remains are treated is of no direct consequence to the well-being of the deceased.</p> Mun Chin Lim Copyright (c) 2022 Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand 2022-11-06 2022-11-06 17 1 An Introduction to an Integrated Model of Ecological Farming and Sustainable Development by Buddhist Peaceful Means: A Case Study of Khok Nong Na Model, Prang Ku, Sisaket https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/parst/article/view/256800 <p>&nbsp;Nowadaysthe productivity in the agricultural sector around the world has dropped significantly due to climate change. It has affected the food system when more than 800 million people in the world face hunger and famine in 2020. Moreover, there are many Thai farmers who are still struggling with poverty and household debt. Confronting these problems have led to a holistic approachof creating “<em>agricultural transformation model” </em>as discussed in my dissertation in progress. The model is consciously designed to include the idea of sustainability to improve the farming system in Thailand and enhance people’s well-being. The purpose of this paper is to understand the problems and envision a possible solution.<a href="applewebdata://9E95B4EC-8579-49A0-9F9B-B79828D268F6#_ftnref1" name="_ftn1"></a></p> Kanchana Horsaengchai Copyright (c) 2022 Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand 2022-11-06 2022-11-06 17 1 A Further Note on “Human Rights” and “Dignity” from a Buddhist Perspective https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/parst/article/view/261244 <p>In this article, I propose a few working hypotheses on the correlation between Buddhism and Human Rights. The exchange of opinions in this particular field has been carried on by eminent scholars in the last few decades, reaching a profound and fecund level. Here, I explore two crucial terms, “rights” and “dignity”, in order to find additional elements to better delineate their significance. I try to show how essential elucidation might come from Buddhist philosophical traditions, which – I believe – can help us to enhance our comprehension of what “rights” and “dignity” are.</p> Claudio Cicuzza Copyright (c) 2022 Journal of the Philosophy and Religion Society of Thailand 2022-11-06 2022-11-06 17 1