Linguistic Strategies and Motivational Concerns for Giving Advice in Thai

A Study of Emancipatory Pragmatics

Authors

  • Wuttinun Kaewjungat Doctoral student, Programme in Applied Linguistics, Department of Linguistics, Faculty of Humanities, Kasetsart University
  • Umaporn Sungkaman Assistant Professor at Department of Linguistics, Faculty of Humanities, Kasetsart University

Keywords:

Linguistic strategies, Motivational concerns, Giving advice, Emancipatory Pragmatics

Abstract

The objective of this research is to study the linguistic strategies used and motivational concerns of giving advice in Thai by using emancipatory pragmatics. Data was collected from 200 respondents via questionnaire, to which 20 were randomly selected for further in-depth interviews. The research results reveal that there are four major linguistic strategies used for giving advice in Thai: 1) to relieve listeners; 2) to express relationships; 3) to give straightforward advice; and 4) to get listeners to agree with the advice. Regarding the motivational concerns when giving advice in Thai, this study shows that  the speakers are genuinely concerned with the feelings of the listeners. This reflects that advice in the context of Thai society and culture is given as a non-coercive act of speech avoiding listeners to lose face by way of extending good wishes to them.

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Published

2021-12-24

How to Cite

Kaewjungat ว., & Sungkaman อ. (2021). Linguistic Strategies and Motivational Concerns for Giving Advice in Thai: A Study of Emancipatory Pragmatics. Journal of the Faculty of Arts, Silpakorn University, 43(2), 76–93. Retrieved from https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jasu/article/view/256244

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Section

Research Articles