A Study on Undergraduates Demands for Social Services Activities by the Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University (Academic Year 2021)

Authors

  • สุวรรณา แซ่เฮ้ง -

Keywords:

Demand, Social Services Activity, Arrangement of Social Services Activity by the Undergraduates , Undergraduates

Abstract

          The objective of the Study on Undergraduates Demands for Social Services Activities by the Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University (Academic Year 2021) was to study on the undergraduates’ demands for social services activities. The samples of the study are 206 undergraduates (normal curricula) of Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University (academic year 2021).The research tool was a questionnaire.
          The findings show that most of the undergraduates used to join the social services activities on holidays; have joined activities concerning conservation and development of environment of the communities; and wanted on-site social or community activities. From the hypothesis testing, it has been found out that undergraduates with different genders had no different demands for the on-site activities and online activities. Meanwhile, undergraduates studying in different years had no different demands for the online activities but had different demands for the on-site activities, with the significance level of 0.05. Suggestions from the study included to invite lecturers to enhance knowledge of tools and online media of different types; and to promote and support on-site activities by adding social activities in the curricula of the majors, so that the undergraduates would have direct experiences with the communities and apply knowledge to the social development.

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Published

2022-08-30

How to Cite

แซ่เฮ้ง ส. (2022). A Study on Undergraduates Demands for Social Services Activities by the Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University (Academic Year 2021). Journal of Social Synergy, 13(2), 14–30. Retrieved from https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/thaijss/article/view/259187

Issue

Section

Research Report