Revisiting critical consequences from armed conflicts in the Shan State, Myanmar: Implications for border development of Chiang Mai province, Thailand

Authors

  • Watchara Pechdin Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation and Management (DPMM), Asian Institute of Technology, Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120, Thailand
  • Mokbul Morshed Ahmad Development Planning Management and Innovation (DPMI), School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120, Thailand

Keywords:

armed conflicts, border development, border security, ethnic conflicts, Shan state

Abstract

 Armed conflicts in the Shan state of Myanmar have changed and contributed the consequences to the border development in Chiang Mai province of Thailand dynamically. Seeking practical recommendations for the Thai government in developing this border, we are here to revisit those critical consequences and its up-to-date impacts to the border development. Data were employed by a documented survey, non-participated observation at the border area, and in-depth interview with key informants. Thematic technique was adopted in accordance with the context of national security concerns. Key findings highlight that the development of Chiang Mai’s border is critically influenced by issues related to drug trafficking, cross-border trade politics, and Shan displacement. The study suggests that Thailand-Shan border development itself should integrate local identity into its plan and regulation. The inclusive policy collaborating in both border-to-border and Government-to-Government levels should be taken into consideration.

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Published

12-10-2022

How to Cite

Pechdin, W. ., & Ahmad, M. M. . (2022). Revisiting critical consequences from armed conflicts in the Shan State, Myanmar: Implications for border development of Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, 43(4), 1067–1074. Retrieved from https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/kjss/article/view/261677

Issue

Section

Research articles