Move Analysis of Abstracts of Agricultural Science Articles

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Sompon Chanrit
Bussba Tonthong

Abstract

Writing an English research article for writers whose first language is not English seems to be a very difficult task. To overcome this problem, the objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of rhetorical move structures in abstracts in agricultural science (food science, plant science, and animal science) in order to identify moves and move sequences in abstracts in agricultural science. Two workshops were performed to see the extent to which the proposed move model can be applied. Ninety abstracts from three agricultural research journals were analyzed using the proposed model to identify rhetorical move structures. The analysis revealed the rhetorical move structures in the agricultural research articles consisted of 13 moves. The moves and move sequences are proposed to be used for analyzing abstracts in agricultural science journals. The findings can be applied in analyzing moves and move patterns for training novice writers in writing abstracts for journal articles in agricultural science and other related fields.

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Section
Research Articles, Academic Articles and Theses

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