Assessing the English Writing Needs of Undergraduate Business Administration Students for ESP Writing Course Development: A Case Study in Thailand

Main Article Content

Tanassanee Jitpanich
Lai Mei Leong
Shaik Abdul Malik Mohamed Ismail

Abstract

In developing an ESP writing course to prepare business administration students for business careers, it is essential to identify their English writing needs. Thus, this study aims to explore the English writing needs of Thai undergraduate business administration students as an initial step of ESP writing course development, highlighting four areas: their perceived writing abilities, writing challenges, required writing skills, and learning preferences. This study employed an interpretivist approach with a qualitative design, drawing on data from semi-structured interviews with 12 business administration students and 16 stakeholders, including employers, employees, entrepreneurs, ESP lecturers, and business lecturers. The findings reflect the learning experiences and insufficient English writing abilities of business administration students and graduates with problematic areas in grammar and vocabulary. In addition, they typically have problems with writing emails and reports. Specifically, three English writing skills were identified as required skills for business administration personnel, namely the skills to write emails providing information, e-commerce product descriptions, and progress reports. Student preferences for business vocabulary and communication expressions, teacher feedback, and a positive learning environment were revealed. This study offers educators and course designers valuable insights into the English writing needs of Thai business administration students for ESP course development.

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How to Cite
Jitpanich, T., Leong, L. M., & Ismail, S. A. M. M. (2022). Assessing the English Writing Needs of Undergraduate Business Administration Students for ESP Writing Course Development: A Case Study in Thailand. LEARN Journal: Language Education and Acquisition Research Network, 15(2), 104–128. Retrieved from https://so04.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/LEARN/article/view/259924
Section
Research Articles
Author Biographies

Tanassanee Jitpanich, TESOL Department, School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia

Ph.D. candidate at the School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia. Her research interests include ESP course design and English writing instruction.

Lai Mei Leong, TESOL Department, School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia

Senior lecturer at the School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia. Her research interests are in TESOL and educational technology.

Shaik Abdul Malik Mohamed Ismail, TESOL Department, School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia

Former Dean and currently an Honorary Associate Professor of Education at the School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia. He is also a Senior Research Fellow at the Industry and Community Network Division.

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